FLRA RELEASES 20TH ANNIVERSARY RETROSPECTIVE

 

FLRA NEWS


FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY · WASHINGTON, DC · 20424
July 1, 1999 · PR 112-99
Contact: Patty Reilly
202-482-6500

FLRA RELEASES 20TH ANNIVERSARY RETROSPECTIVE

The Federal Labor Relations Authority (FLRA) announced today the release of its 20th Anniversary Retrospective, "

FLRA 20 Years 1979-1999

." The publication is part of a series of commemorative events undertaken by the FLRA in its anniversary year. Other events include two recently completed national training conferences attended by nearly 500 people.

The 20th Anniversary Retrospective presents an overview of the FLRA's development since its creation by Title VII of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978. The publication traces the FLRA's evolution over the years from emphasizing statutory enforcement through litigation, to developing and expanding initiatives promoting the practice of constructive labor relations through interest-based resolution of disputes. Significant case law, case trends, and statutory amendments are also described.

The Retrospective highlights three recent accomplishments:

  • Since 1995, the FLRA has rewritten its regulations governing representation petitions, negotiability appeals, unfair labor practice (ULP) charges and litigation, and bargaining impasse resolution. The revised regulations incorporate central principles of interest-based problem solving, now a cornerstone of FLRA practice. They also are designed to ease procedural burdens on parties, be "user-friendly", and refine the legal and factual issues in dispute.

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  • An emphasis on strengthening the quality of adjudication has lead to increasing deference from appellate courts. The percentage of Authority decisions favorably reviewed by federal courts has significantly increased: from 52% of decisions issued during the FLRA's first 16 years and reviewed on the merits, to over 84% of decisions issued in 1995-1998 and reviewed on the merits. Most recently, the two Authority decisions reviewed this term by the United States Supreme Court were both affirmed, contrasting with affirmance of only one of the five Authority decisions reviewed by the Supreme Court in prior years. In all seven cases appealed to the Supreme Court since the FLRA's creation, Federal agencies challenged the Authority's construction of the Federal labor statute as too expansive.

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  • The FLRA has been recognized as innovative and effective. The FLRA recently r